Windows Terminal: complete reference


Windows is the most popular PC Operating System in the world, and for good reason. Not only has Microsoft made the Operating system easy to use, but it has also blessed it with a gazillion of power-user-friendly features. Command Prompt, Windows Subsystem for Linux, and PowerShell were always good enough for advanced users. To make the whole command line programming system more streamlined, Microsoft released Windows Terminal. You can download and install the app from Microsoft Store.

Introduction

Windows Terminal is a terminal interface for command-line tools and shells, which allows users to put their favorite command-line applications under a single umbrella. It offers multi-tab support, personalized features — colored window, text formatting, and more — Unicode or UTF-8 character support, GPU-aided text rendering, and other noteworthy tools.

1. Productivity – Profiles

Windows Terminal lets you create multiple profiles for different shells. Essentially, you can configure these profiles in any way. I would cover some of the use cases to help you get started.

Steps to create new profile [more info]

  • Open the Windows Terminal application.
  • Click the drop-down button on the title bar.
  • Select the “Settings” option.
  • Click “Add new” option on the sidebar.
  • Type a name in the “Profile name” field.
  • Click the “Browse” button next to the Command Line field.
  • Select the CMD shell exe file and click “Open.”
  • Hit the “Save” button.
  • With that, you have added a new profile to the Windows Terminal.

Alternate, more advanced way is to click Open JSON file at the bottom left and edit the configuration file directly.

We would use the JSON file. Note that you might have to restart Windows Terminal to reflect changes on JSON. Each profile needs a unique GUID. You can either use the GUIDs exactly as follows or you can generate yours like following:

Generate GUID using PowerShell Core profile, showing my unique customization in Windows Terminal app

25+ Color Themes!

My code snippets would have references to these themes as an added bonus, if you would want to save countless hours creating and picking these color themes.

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cmd.exe and PowerShell profiles

This probably is the most obvious one. Windows Terminal would come with this profile.

{
 "commandline": "cmd.exe",
 "guid": "{0caa0dad-35be-5f56-a8ff-afceeeaa6101}",
 "hidden": false,
 "name": "Command Prompt"
},
{
 "commandline": "powershell.exe",
 "fontFace": "CaskaydiaCove NF",
 "guid": "{61c54bbd-c2c6-5271-96e7-009a87ff44bf}",
 "hidden": false,
 "name": "Windows PowerShell"
}

PowerShell Core profile

PowerShell Core is a cross-platfrom (Windows, Linux and macOS) software. It has command-line shell, an associated scripting language and a framework for processing cmdlets. If you are new, please check out their home page.

{
 "commandline": "pwsh.exe",
 "fontFace": "CaskaydiaCove NF",
 "guid": "{574e775e-4f2a-5b96-ac1e-a2962a402336}",
 "hidden": false,
 "name": "PowerShell Core",
 "source": "Windows.Terminal.PowershellCore",
 "tabTitle": "PowerShell Core",
 "colorScheme": "SMYCK"
}

Anaconda Environments

We can create a custom profile with command line arguments to start a profile with specific Anaconda virtual environment. In other words, you can very easily create different profiles or tabs, for each Anaconda environment you have.

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SSH Profile

When I was using AWS EMR or, AWS EC2 I had to use SSH prompt along with PuTTY. For authentication we would use ppk file and enable dynamic port forwarding. In principle Windows 10 has built in SSH client but for some reason, I ended up using a command line utility called Plink – from the same publisher of PuTTy.

{
 "commandline": "C:\\instals\\plink.exe -ssh -i %USERPROFILE%\\Documents\\data\\my-key.ppk -D 8088 ec2-user@xx.xx.xx.xx:xx",
 "cursorShape": "vintage",
 "guid": "{fc51cff4-926b-4287-b1a2-fa2f23dc78e5}",
 "hidden": false,
 "icon": "%USERPROFILE%\\Pictures\\icons\\rhel8.png",
 "name": "AWS EC2 Red Hat (RHEL8)"
},
{
 "commandline": "C:\\instals\\plink.exe -ssh -i %USERPROFILE%\\Documents\\data\\my-key.ppk -D 8088 hadoop@yy.yy.yyy.yy:yy",
 "cursorShape": "vintage",
 "guid": "{f8f0b31d-3ab5-49c7-b455-89dbfea31d14}",
 "hidden": false,
 "icon": "%USERPROFILE%\\Pictures\\icons\\aws.ico",
 "name": "AWS EMR SSH"
}

Git bash profile

If you have installed git bash, you can also create a profile for it.

{
 "commandline": "%USERPROFILE%\\AppData\\Local\\Programs\\Git\\bin\\bash.exe --cd-to-home",
 "cursorShape": "vintage",
 "guid": "{848fe68a-c7ab-4123-bbbc-bd24c792ca29}",
 "hidden": false,
 "icon": "%USERPROFILE%\\AppData\\Local\\Programs\\Git\\mingw64\\share\\git\\git-for-windows.ico",
 "name": "git bash"
}

Ubuntu Linux profile

If you have not already, follow these steps for installing Linux subsystem in Windows 10 and downloading a Linux distribution like Ubuntu from Microsoft Store: https://itsfoss.com/install-bash-on-windows/

{
 "colorScheme": "Ubuntu",
 "cursorColor": "#DD4814",
 "cursorShape": "filledBox",
 "fontFace": "Cascadia Mono",
 "guid": "{07b52e3e-de2c-5db4-bd2d-ba144ed6c273}",
 "hidden": false,
 "name": "Ubuntu-20.04",
 "source": "Windows.Terminal.Wsl",
 "icon": "%USERPROFILE%\\Pictures\\icons\\Ubuntu.ico",
 "useAcrylic": true,
 "acrylicOpacity": 0.85
}

2. Personalize – Oh my posh!

There is a very good chance that you have heard about this module.

Scott Hansekman’s YouTube video on how to set up Oh my posh

After you have completed the steps in the video above, and got it to work, you could download the themes and preview them using the following command. More documentation is available at: https://ohmyposh.dev/docs/.

$ Get-PoshThemes

If you are interested, you can download my very own custom theme for free at: https://gist.github.com/aarshtalati/085b9f757acb61242bbe8bd7c5829243.

Install PySpark on Linux


You probably have heard about it, wherever there is a talk about big data the name eventually comes up. In layman’s words Apache Spark is a large-scale data processing engine. Apache Spark provides various APIs for services to perform big data processing on it’s engine. PySpark is the Python API, exposing Spark programming model to Python applications. In my previous blog post, I talked about how set it up on Windows in my previous post. This time, we shall do it on Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8 or 7. You can follow along with free AWS EC2 instance, your hypervisor (VirtualBox, VMWare, Hyper-V, etc.) or a container on almost any Linux distribution. Commands we discuss below might slightly change from one distribution to the next.

Like most of my blog posts, my objective is to write a comprehensive post on real world end to end configuration, rather than talking about just one step. On Red Hat 7, I ran into a problem. I solved this problem without having to solve it.

The Author

Environment

  • Linux (I am using Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8 and 7)
  • Java
  • Hadoop
  • Spark
  • Anaconda or pip based virtual python environment

I have broken out the process into steps. Please feel free to skip a section as you deem appropriate.

Table of Contents

Continue reading “Install PySpark on Linux”

Migrate Perforce to git(hub) repo


Assumptions

  • You have done your due diligence to compare the two (from price, speed, workflow, onboarding etc. perspectives) and have concluded that reasons to migrate Perforce to git are beneficial for you.
  • Word of caution. Do you have “large files”? Well, define “large”! Some cloud vendors set some limit for what is the maximum limit of your file could you upload to the cloud. Check out this Powershell script: Powershell.P4Sizes · GitHub

Migration

To prepare for surprises, plan ahead on how would you verify if the migration has succeeded!

Author
Continue reading “Migrate Perforce to git(hub) repo”

Create/Update dictionary form list


There is a straight forward way to update an existing or empty directory from given a list of keys. In the first example below, we update dict only with keys, which were not already present. Notice that the key ‘a’ did get change and ‘z’ did not get deleted – they were left alone. The second example, basically initializes an empty dict object. Whereas, the third example creates a new dict object which did not exist before.

Continue reading “Create/Update dictionary form list”

[4/4] Docker: Front-end development w/ Java, SpringBoot MVC & RESTful Web API


Today we are going to talk about adding front end user interface to our application, from scratch. We can add the front end to our application using something called view resolvers. Our options are Apache Tiles, JavaServer Pages (JSP), etc. there are many other options, as well. Spring Boot supports FreeMarker templates, Groovy Templates and Themyleaf via “AutoConfiguration”, as the first class citizens. As the name suggests, we should not need to do a whole lot to get going with one of these. In this video we would be looking at Thymeleaf. I find it easy to use and feature rich at the same time. Thymeleaf is mostly HTML. Finally, we will talk about Web JARs & How to add Branding to our web application, using responsive web design. Continue reading “[4/4] Docker: Front-end development w/ Java, SpringBoot MVC & RESTful Web API”

SpringBoot: Debug faster


Tired of rebuilding your Spring Boot web application every time you change your HTML markup or Java class? Thanks to IntelliJ IDEA and SpringBoot DevTools, you can easily code and debug faster without wasting time rebuilding your application over and over again. The solution discussed here would run your project as soon as your code change, and it would refresh your Thymeleaf HTML templates for the front end without even having to rebuild the project.

The actual work required to configure your project is not much. All, in all, you need to Continue reading “SpringBoot: Debug faster”

C# Split CSV string


string str = "Tom Cruise, Scott, ,Bob | at";
IEnumerable<string> names = str
.Split(new char[]{',', '|'})
.Where(x=>x!=null && x.Trim().Length > 0)
.Select(x=>x.Trim());

Output

Tom
Cruise
Scott
Bob
at

Stackoverflow post:
https://stackoverflow.com/a/45799171/799593

Parsing XML with special characters