Employer Handbook 0


Often, we have an employee handbook. We never have one for employers, though. In this article, I try to share a boiler plate employer handbook.

  1. Always encourage craftsmanship, and hire people smarter than you.
  2. Employees don’t leave their companies. They leave their manager.
  3. Whether you hire a CEO, CFO, or a developer, ask the new hire to work with the business for three weeks and three weeks for technical and application support teams.
  4. Review, control and verify line of business’ priorities. This is the world where everyone has their hidden agenda.
  5. Rotate leadership, responsibilities and, roles at least once a year. Let the dictators in the organization know what they are, and kill hypocrisy.
  6. Communication is the oxygen. If you are a large or medium-large business, don’t just rely on your direct reports. Dig deeper. Stay in touch with the lower than only your direct reports. At least twice in a quarter, commence 1:1 meetings with your direct reports two levels below.  
  7. Evaluate performance evaluation matrices.
  8. Practice servant leadership. Give your subordinates a reason to trust you. A higher job grade is just for a bigger paycheck. 
  9. Always try to find out the diversity of the professional talent at your disposal. You’ll have employees who live like a frog in the well and want to stay in their comfort zone, but they know their well like no other. You’d also have employees with widespread experience. The other kind are the one who are hungry to learn more and grow. Encourage teammates to take on additional responsibilities, for better financial incentives – especially the third kind. Offer a chance for them to take internal transfers after a few years in a specific position, if they would like to grow their career.
  10. The Buddy system in hiring is – A leader hires buddies (or buddy’s consulting firm) from the past acquaintance regardless of their qualification or core-competencies. It is a nuisance. Detect it proactively. Take actions to mitigate it and prevent it.

2 Comments

Leave a Comment

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s